Pancreatitis

pancreatis can lead to diabetes

Pancreatitis is a condition where there exists severe inflammation of the pancreas. The pancreas is a leaf-shaped gland situated behind the lower part of the stomach and extending downward toward the spleen and left kidney. The primary functions of the pancreas are to produce enzymes that help to breakdown proteins, fats and carbohydrates and aid in digestion, and to release the hormones insulin and glycogen, which regulates blood sugar levels.

There has recently been accumulating data that shows that oxidative stress resulting from free-radicals overwhelming the body’s natural antioxidant immunity has a role in acute pancreatitis. The disease can wither be it acute or chronic. A high percentage of cases are due to alcohol abuse, infection, drug use (Imuran, 6-MP), and excessive stress on the adrenal glands and the thyroid

There is a logical assumption that antioxidant therapy should help prevent pancreatitis, especially in acute, recurrent attacks. High levels of triglycerides (fat) in the bloodstream may be a factor in pancreatitis.

There are few therapies available to patients that can relieve recurrent attacks of this disease. Patients can suffer from considerable pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, excessive gas, hypertension, sweating, muscle aches, and abnormal, fatty stools. Because the pancreas releases insulin that helps to maintain blood glucose, any prolonged problem or disease associated with the pancreas can lead to diabetes.

DIET

Eat a diet that is low in fat, refined sugar, and red meat. It is advisable to follow a diet that is associated with combating diabetes.

SUPPLEMENT PROTOCOL

  1. DIGESTIVE ENZYMES (with PANCREATIN)
    Replacement with enzymes is crucial to aid in digestion, increase gastric emptying of food, and help in breaking down proteins. Extra pancreatin is necessary since enzyme deficiency is common in patients with pancreatitis. If the patient had there gall bladder removed this necessitates the increased need for digestive enzymes (with ox bile included). Dosage: 1-3 capsules 5-10 minutes before each meal, or as directed. 
  2. RAW PANCREAS GLANDULAR
    Glandulars may contain certain proteins needed to repair the pancreas. Dosage: As directed by a qualified health care practitioner. 
  3. CHROMIUM PICOLONATE   
    This mineral is important in helping to maintain blood sugar levels. Dosage: 200-600 mcg daily. 
  4. EXTRA ANTIOXIDANTS
    These common antioxidants are potent free-radical scavengers that will help decrease the oxidative stress on the pancreas. They also aid in tissue repair and carry oxygen to the organ. Dosage: Vitamin C 1,000-5,000 mg daily; Vitamin E 200-400 IU daily; Vitamin A 5,000-10,000 IU daily; Selenium 200 mcg daily. 
  5. VITAMIN B COMPLEX
    B complex are the ‘anti-stress’ vitamins that also rejuvenate and repair cells. Additional B complex vitamin such as NIACIN and PANTOTHENIC ACID (Vitamin B5) may also aid in fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Dosage: 50-100 mg 1-2 times a day. 
  6. CALCIUM CITRATE and MAGNESIUM
    Both minerals are vital for pancreatic function and have a direct affect on how carbohydrates are broken down. They also are needed for adrenal function. Dosage: Calcium 1,000-1,500 mg daily; Magnesium 500-750 mg daily. 
  7. CLEANSING HERBS
    Versatile herbs such as MILK THISTLE, DANDELION ROOT, BURDOCK ROOT and RED CLOVER aid in cleansing the bloodstream and liver, reducing the toxin load on the pancreas. Dosage: As directed. 
  8. GARLIC     
    This herb has potent anti-viral and antioxidant characteristics. Dosage: As directed on label. 
  9. CO-ENZYME Q10
    A potent antioxidant that helps to increase energy, support the adrenal glands, remove toxins, and boost the immune system. Dosage: 50-200 mg daily. 
  10. CYSTEINE and METHIONINE
    These are two amino acids that help to detoxify heavy metals from the pancreas and also protect the liver. Dosage: As directed on label. 

 

Balach, PA, Balach, JF, Prescription for Nutritional Healing, Third Edition, Avery Press, New York, 2000.

Bandolier Library, Drug Watch: Antioxidant Therapy for Recurrent Pancreatitis, April 10, 2003.

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